John Moore Pamment

Male 1857 - 1937  (80 years)


Personal Information    |    Media    |    Notes    |    Sources    |    All    |    PDF

  • Name John Moore Pamment  [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10
    Born 19 May 1857  Isleham, Cambridgeshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11
    Gender Male 
    Baptism 31 Jan 1858  Isleham, Cambridgeshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [12
    Residence 1861  Hackney St John, Middlesex, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [7
    Residence 1871  Islington St Mary, London, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [9
    Occupation 1881  Clerk, Stedham, Sussex, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [13
    Residence 1881  Stedham, Sussex, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [10
    Occupation (3) 1891  Hendon, Middlesex, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [14
    Editor 
    Residence 1891  Hendon, Middlesex, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [6
    Occupation (2) 1898  Tacoma, Pierce, Washington, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [15
    Presbyterian Minister 
    Residence 1900  Tacoma city, Pierce, Washington Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Residence 1910  Tacoma Ward 5, Pierce, Washington Find all individuals with events at this location  [5
    Occupation (4) Between 1919 and 1925  Minister, First Presbyterian Church, Woodland, Washington Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Residence Washington Find all individuals with events at this location  [3
    Residence 1920  Woodland, Cowlitz, Washington Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    Residence 1930  Olympia, Thurston, Washington Find all individuals with events at this location  [4
    _MDCL Time and date of death - May 22, 1937 at 2:45 pm. 
    Died 22 May 1937  Olympia, Thurston, Washington, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [8, 16
    Cause: Arteriosclerosis and age 
    Buried 25 May 1937  Masonic Memorial Park, Tumwater, Thurston County, Washington Find all individuals with events at this location  [17
    Person ID I4749  PammentIsleham
    Last Modified 16 Feb 2015 

    Father Benaiah Pamment,   b. 11 Jul 1824, Isleham, Cambridgeshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 13 Jan 1872, London, (Islington district) N1 England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 47 years) 
    Relationship Natural 
    Mother Elizabeth Moore,   b. 25 May 1825, Isleham, Cambridgeshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 27 Feb 1907, Long Marston, Tring, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 81 years) 
    Relationship Natural 
    Married 23 May 1850  Isleham, Cambridgeshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [18, 19
    Notes 
    • From the marriage certificate:

      1850 Marriage solemnized at the parish church in the parish of Isleham

      May 23, 1850

      Benaiah Pamment, age full, bachelor, wheelwright. Residence Isleham. Father's name - Benjamin Pamment, occupation thatcher.

      Elizabeth Moore, age full, spinster. Residence Isleham. Father William Moore, father's occupation labourer.

      Witnesses: The mark of James Parr. Caroline Moore.
    Family ID F563  Group Sheet

    Family 1 Agnes Thomas,   b. 04 Jul 1861, Morecambe, Lancashire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 16 Jun 1912, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 50 years) 
    Married 17 Sep 1881  Christ Church, Ware registration district Hertfordshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [1, 20, 21
    Notes 
    • Marriage certificate - occupation: clerk. Residence: 66 Twisden Road, London, England.

      1881 - Marriage solemnized at the Parish Church in the Parish of Ware in the county of Hertford.

      Sept. 17, 1881
      John Moore Pamment, age 24, bachelor. Profession: clerk. Address is 66 Twisden Road, London. Father's name Benaiah Pamment, father's profession Wheelwright.

      Agnes Thomas, age 20, spinster. Residence is "Highgate Rd. London" and "Ware." Father is Richard Philip Thomas, occupation Mechanic.

      Witnesses were: Richard Philip Thomas and George Thomas.
    Children 
     1. Agnes Margaret Pamment,   b. 14 May 1889, Hendon, Middlesex, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 28 Nov 1974, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 85 years)
     2. Ernest Philip Pamment,   b. 01 Feb 1893, Tacoma, Pierce, Washington, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 20 Apr 1950, Seattle, King County, Washington Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 57 years)
     3. Blanche Elizabeth Pamment,   b. 27 Mar 1904, Tacoma, Pierce County, Washington, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 11 Aug 1972, Tonasket, Okanogan, Washington, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 68 years)
     4. Reginald Thomas Pamment,   b. 30 Jan 1884, Hendon, Middlesex, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 14 Jan 1966, Los Angeles, California Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 81 years)
     5. John Benaiah Pamment,   b. 27 Sep 1882, Sudbury, Middlesex, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 25 Sep 1983, Seattle, King County, Washington Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 100 years)
     6. Ethel Mary Pamment,   b. 08 Feb 1895, Tacoma, Pierce County, Washington, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 25 Oct 1984, Nevada City, California Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 89 years)
    Last Modified 16 Feb 2015 
    Family ID F1535  Group Sheet

    Family 2 Lillian J. Russell,   b. Abt Feb 1866, Portland, Multnomah, Oregon, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 23 Nov 1941, Seattle, King, Washington, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 75 years) 
    Married 27 Dec 1916  Washougal, Clark, Washington, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [22
    Notes 
    • THE EATONVILLE DISPATCH
      Eatonville, Washington, January 12, 1917
      Volume 2, Number 21

      Rev. Pamment returned home Thursday evening, Jan. 4, with his bride. Rev. and Mrs.
      Pamment were quietly married Dec. 27 in Washougal, Wash. And left immediately after
      for a short trip. Their friends and congregation gave them a reception Saturday evening at
      the church. Mr. Wright gave the welcoming address. Solos were rendered by Mrs.
      Stewart, Mrs. Pankey, and Mrs. V. Gilbert. Miss Ethel Pamment gave a suitable
      instrumental selection. Recitations by Mrs. Wright and Mrs. Anthony completed a very
      interesting program. Later in the evening, sherbet and wafers were served. Mrs. Pamment
      formerly lived in Mineral and has many friends to welcome her return.

      Mrs. Stamford, daughter of Rev. Pamment, leaves for her home in Vancouver, B. C.,
      Thursday.
    Children 
     1. Blanche Elizabeth Pamment,   b. 27 Mar 1904, Tacoma, Pierce County, Washington, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 11 Aug 1972, Tonasket, Okanogan, Washington, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 68 years)
    Last Modified 16 Feb 2015 
    Family ID F1536  Group Sheet

  • Photos
    John Moore Pamment & wife Agnes (Thomas) Pamment
    John Moore Pamment & wife Agnes (Thomas) Pamment
    A photo of John Moore Pamment and his wife Agnes (Thomas) Pamment, taken in 1892.
    The John Moore Pamment family in 1893
    The John Moore Pamment family in 1893
    Front: Agnes Margaret Pamment and baby Ernest Philip Pamment.
    Seated L to R: John Moore Pamment, John Benaiah Pamment, Reginald Thomas Pamment, and Agnes Thomas Pamment

  • Notes 
    • A TIMELINE LOOK AT THE LIFE OF JOHN MOORE PAMMENT:

      1857 - Recorded as "Boy" Pamment on birth certificate 25 may 1857. Address is Cock Street, Isleham, Cambs.
      1871: Census - age 13. Islington. Grocer's porter.
      1872 JAN: father dies when John was 14
      1881 census, dwelling: Ash, Stedham, Sussex, England. John M. Pamment, unmarried, age 22, birth Isleham, Cambs. was a visitor in the house of Walter Hawford. John M. Pamment's occupation was Clerk.
      1881 SEPT: marriage certificate: Occupation: clerk. Residence: 66 Twisden Road, London
      1882 SEPT: birth of son at Sudbury, Middlesex, England
      1884 JAN: birth of son at Hendon, Middlesex, England
      Ordained in Congregational Church of England
      SEPT: arrived in New York, moved to Glendive, Montana, to become Congregational minister
      1885 Moved to Washougal, Clark County, Washington
      1887 CENSUS: Washington Territory, Clark County
      1888 Returned to England with family and became editor of a temperance newspaper
      1889 MAY: birth of daughter at Hendon, Middlesex, England
      1891 CENSUS: Middlesex County, Hendon, England. John M. Pamment, Head, age 33. Also wife Agnes (29), son John B. Pamment
      (8), son Reginald T. Pamment (7), daughter Agnes B. Pamment (age 1 ?). Occupation for John is "Editorial."
      (NOTE: It appears that "Author" may have been written and erased.)
      1892 JUL: Left England on the 'Mongolian,' landed in Quebec, took Canadian Pacific train to Vancouver, BC
      SEPT: missionary to the Puyallup, Nisqually, Mud Bay, and Chehalis Indian Reservations under direction of the Presbyterian Church
      1893 FEB: birth of son at Tacoma, Pierce County, Washington - residence 319 35th
      SPRING: moved into manse (parsonage) on the Puyallup Indian Reservation
      1897 CITY DIRECTORY - Tacoma, Washington: residence 1605 S 43rd
      1898 PRESBYTERIAN MINISTERIAL DIRECTORY, Pamment, J. Moore, Ordination 5/1883. Street 1655 S. 43rd St. Tacoma, Washington
      1900 CENSUS: Washington, Pierce County, Tacoma, 1605 Asotin
      1901 CITY DIRECTORY - Tacoma, Washington: residence 4832 S. L Street
      1902 Naturalized (according to 1920 census)
      1904 CITY DIRECTORY - Tacoma, Washington: coll (ector) City Retail Lumber Company
      1905 CITY DIRECTORY - Tacoma, Washington: Johns & Pamment, lumber dealers, South Tacoma yard
      1906 CITY DIRECTORY - Tacoma, Washington: Secretary and Treasurer, Park Lumber Co
      1909 CITY DIRECTORY - Tacoma, Washington: Bookkeeper, McCormack Bros
      1910 CENSUS: Washington, Pierce County, Tacoma, 5236 S. M Street
      1912 CITY DIRECTORY - Victoria, BC, Canada: 1611 Bank St
      JUNE: Agnes dies at home, 1611 Bank St, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
      1913 CITY DIRECTORY - Victoria, BC, Canada: 1967 Oak Bay
      1915 CITY DIRECTORY - Tacoma, Washington: E 1301 6th Ave (with Ernest and Ethel)
      1916 Pastor in Mineral, Lewis County, Washington
      JUNE: officiated at the wedding of son Ernest in Tacoma
      1920 CENSUS: Washington, Cowlitz County, Woodland Township, 102 First Street W, Roll T625_1920, Page 14A, ED: 49
      1927 Retired to Olympia, Thurston County, Washington
      1937 MAY: John dies at home, 1516 E 8th Ave, Olympia

      ----------

      NOTE: Clark County (Washington) Pioneers listing - has a Rev. John M. Pamment and a Beniah Pamment.

      ----------

      From The Temperance Caterer, November 15th, 1898 (London, Middlesex, England)

      All About Everything

      Among the Indians.-The former editor of this journal, Rev. John. W. Pamment is still doing plodding mission work among the Indians. We cull the following from the Occident.

      In previous communications says Mr. Pamment, your readers have been informed of the Indian work carried on in the Presbytery of Olympia of which the writer has had charge during the past six years.

      In this I wish to speak only of some special visiting during August and September amongst Indians not regularly reached by me at other times of the year. The two months referred to above are the most difficult in the whole year in this work by reason of the scattering out of the Indians far and wide. Fishing, berrying, hop-picking, and an inborn love of wandering takes these people in every direction at this season, and to reach them one has to follow where they go.

      In two of the three Indian churches the services during these two months were necessarily abandoned. At the Puyallup Indian church, which is the largest, there were enough of the elders and members remaining at home to conduct service each Sabbath in August, and part of September. Leaving Tacoma early in August and taking a small tent, so as to be quite free to camp wherever night overtook me, I spent the first Sabbath with the Nesqually Indian church, before proceeding to places farther off. It was a good day. Although some of the members were away, there were a few at home, and these with some Warm Spring Indians who had come to visit, we met for worship and preaching in the church, afterward repairing to the nearest Indian house where we concluded the day by partaking of a simple repast and keeping a kind of family meeting during the latter part of the day.

      Our next halt was at South Bay, and from thence into Olympia and on to Mud Bay where the Indians are found living for a great distance along the shores of Puget Sound, which at this place reaches far inland. The work here was visiting from house to house, or camp, or wherever they were found. I had with me a good supply of small picture Scripture cards, as well as the large charts used in our Sabbath-schools, which are a never failing source of pleasure to these people. The former please the children, the latter are first explained to the parents and then hung upon the wall of the house, or left for that purpose, and thus continue to preach by the color and figures upon them after I leave. One case may be cited as showing how much these charts are appreciated. In one house, after staying with four adult Indians, telling them of the love of God, I unfolded my roll of charts and presented them with two, first explaining the Scripture represented by them. Before leaving, they expressed their thanks in two ways-one way by assuring me they had good minds toward God, and desired to know more concerning Him ; the other, by offering me twenty-five cents to buy food with in prosecuting so good a work. This case may serve to illustrate the object of undertaking this trip ; namely, visiting the Indians at their homes, and the spirit in which these people receive any effort for their good ; although I must add it was the only case in which money was offered.

      ----------

      1900 CENSUS - Washington, Pierce County, Tacoma 1605 Asotin St. ward 5, Enum. Dist. 185, vol 13, Sheet 5, line 77
      Pamment, John M. Head, Born May 1857, age 43, Married 18 years
      Pamment, Agnes, Wife, born July 1861, age 38, Married 18 years, mother to 6 children, 5 alive
      Pamment, John B., son, born Sep 1882, age 17
      Pamment, Reginald, son, born Feb. 1884, age 16
      Pamment, Agnes M., daughter, born May 1889, age 11
      Pamment, Ernest P., son, born Feb. 1893, age 7
      Pamment, Ethel M., daughter, born Feb. 1895, age 5

      1910 CENSUS - Washington, Pierce County, Tacoma, 5236 S. M Street ward 5, Enum Dist 266, volume 175, Sheet 20, line 7
      Pamment, John M., Head, age 50, married 27 years
      Pamment, Agnes, wife, age 48, married 27 years. Mother of 5 children born/5 living
      Pamment, Reginald, son, age 23
      Pamment, Agnes M., daughter, age 20
      Pamment, Ernest P., son, age 17
      Pamment, Ethel M., daughter, age 16
      Pamment, Blanche E., daughter, age 6

      -----------

      From Paul H. Barclift the following note was obtained:

      Reverend John and wife Agnes emigrated to America from England in 1885 to do missionary work. They initially were sent to the Congressional Church in Washougal, Clark County, where they stayed for two years before returning to England. Five years later they returned again to Washington. Reverend John was placed in charge of missionary work in the Nisqually, Mud Bay, Puyallup and Chehalis Indian Reservations. They lived in the manse which had been built for them next to the church on the Puyallup reservation. They continued to live there until Ernest was 5 years old. At 17 yrs of age Ernest got his first job as a clerk at Younglove Grocery Company and later was promoted to salesman. They stayed with the ministry from 1892 until 1904 when Agnes' poor health caused him to resign from missionary work. He then turned to newspaper work for which he was trained in England. In 1912 the family moved to Victoria, British Columbia for Agnes's health. After the death of Agnes, John returned to Olympia and continued to teach bible classes.

      ----------

      THE EATONVILLE DISPATCH
      Eatonville, Washington, October 6, 1916
      Volume 2, Number 7

      Pg. 1, col. 7
      MINERAL NEWS

      Twice recently the Rev. Pamment family, have been remembered by the kindly gifts of Mineral people. Mr. and Mrs. Dreager left some venison and Mr. and Mrs. Schmidt of the Inn sent a box of apples. Rev. Pamment says that these gifts are appreciated beyond the intrinsic value of the articles, being expressions of good will.

      ----------

      THE EATONVILLE DISPATCH
      Eatonville, Washington, October 20, 1916
      Volume 2, Number 9

      Page 1, col. 6
      MINERAL NEWS

      The Prayer Meeting members of the Presbyterian Church went in a body to Miller and Wilson's camp on the Ladd branch, last Wednesday night to hold service with the ladies and friends there. The company all told, were nine, in the visiting party. They met six at the camp and the hour spent was enjoyed by all. The Rev. Pamment has visited this camp through the summer and has also visited other parts of the vicinity, including the Japanese camp.

      ----------

      THE EATONVILLE DISPATCH
      Eatonville, Washington, January 12, 1917
      Volume 2, Number 21

      Rev. Pamment returned home Thursday evening, Jan. 4, with his bride. Rev. and Mrs. Pamment were quietly married Dec. 27 in Washougal, Wash. And left immediately after for a short trip. Their friends and congregation gave them a reception Saturday evening at the church. Mr. Wright gave the welcoming address. Solos were rendered by Mrs. Stewart, Mrs. Pankey, and Mrs. V. Gilbert. Miss Ethel Pamment gave a suitable instrumental selection. Recitations by Mrs. Wright and Mrs. Anthony completed a very interesting program. Later in the evening, sherbet and wafers were served. Mrs. Pamment formerly lived in Mineral and has many friends to welcome her return.

      Mrs. Stamford, daughter of Rev. Pamment, leaves for her home in Vancouver, B. C., Thursday.

      ----------

      1920 Federal Census
      Name: John M Pamment
      Age: 62 years
      Estimated birth year: 1857
      Birthplace: England
      Race: White
      Home in 1920: Woodland, Cowlitz, Washington
      Pamment, Lillian J., wife, age 53
      Pamment, Blanche E., daughter, age 15

      -------------------

      FAMILY REUNION HELD August 12, 1928 in Tacoma, Washington. A photocopy of the signatures of those present at the reunion exists:

      Rev. J.M. Pamment
      Lillian Pamment
      J. B. Pamment
      R. T. Pamment
      Agnes Margaret Stamford
      Ernest P Pamment
      Blanche Pamment Beyers

      ----------

      From THE TACOMA NEWS TRIBUNE, Monday, May 24, 1937
      "Missionary Leader Dies"

      Olympia, May 24 - Rev. John Moore Pamment, 80, prominent missionary of Western Washington, died at his home, 1516 East Eighth Avenue, in Olympia, Saturday. He had spent a lifetime as a missionary and in the ministry.

      He was born in London, England (NOTE: incorrect fact - it was Isleham) May 19, 1857, and when only a young man started studying for the ministry under some of the best known ministers of England. His education completed, he came to the United States and served as the Congregational minister at Glendive, Montana for about one year and then came to the Columbia River and Portland, where he also served as the Congregational pastor, and in 1885 returned to London and was editor of a temperance paper, during which time he did open air mission work, singing and preaching in hospitals and parks of London. In 1892 he returned to the United States, coming direct to Western Washington, where he was placed in charge of missionary work in the Nisqually, Mud Bay, Puyallup and Chehalis Indian reservations under the direction of the Presbyterian church, remaining here until 1905, when he took a pastorate at Victoria, B.C. for three years, returning to Western Washington, where he engaged in home missionary work.

      Mr. Pamment was retired 10 years ago and with his wife (NOTE: second wife) came to Olympia to make their home where they have resided since. He leaves a widow, Mrs. Lillian J. Pamment of Olympia, children Mrs. W. L. Stamford of Prince Rupert, B.C., Mrs. E. Thiessen of Everett, Washington, Mrs. F.C. Beyers of Tonasket, Washington, John B. and E.P. Pamment of Seattle, and R. T. Pamment of Long Beach, Calif. and also a sister, Miss Hannah A. Pamment, and a brother, William Pamment, both of London, and eight grandchildren.

      Funeral services will be held from the Warnica and Warnica funeral home Tuesday at 11 a.m. with committal in a local cemetery. Rev. L. Wendall Taylor officiating.

      ----------

      From THE DAILY OLYMPIAN, May 1937
      "Reverend Pamment Dies at Eighty"

      Reverend John Moore Pamment, 80, retired missionary, died at his home 1516 East Eighth Avenue Saturday afternoon. Funeral services will be held from Warnica and Warnica chapel Tuesday morning at 11 o'clock. Rev. L. Wendell Taylor officiating.

      Reverend Pamment was born in England May 19, 1857. When a young man he began his study for the ministry under some of the well-known ministers of England. After coming to the United States he acted as minister in the Congregational church at Glendive, Montana, before coming to the Columbia river district.

      He returned to London in 1885 as editor on a temperance paper. During that time he conducted open air mission work, singing and preaching in hospitals and parks of London.

      Returning to the United States in 1892, he came directly to Western Washington where he was placed in charge of missionary work in the Nisqually, Mud Bay, Puyallup and Chehalis Indian reservations under the supervision of the Presbyterian Church. His later years of active service he spent in home missionary work.

      Reverend Pamment retired 10 years ago and with Mrs. Pamment came to Olympia to establish their home. Survivors include the widow, Mrs. Lillian J. Pamment, three daughters, Mrs. E. Thiessen, Everett, Mrs. F. C. Beyers, Tonasket and Mrs. W. L. Stamford, Prince Rupert, B.C., three sons, John B. and E.P. Pamment of Seattle and R. T. Pamment of Long Beach, California; one sister Miss Hanna A. Pamment and one brother William Pamment, both of London, England and eight grandchildren.

      ----------

      "History of the life and missionary work of the Reverend John Moore Pamment"

      Written February 1, 1957 in Seattle, Washington by John Benaiah Pamment, his eldest son, and affectionately dedicated to his memory.

      The Pamment family originated among the Huguenots in France. Throughout the 16th and 17th centuries there was a persecution of Protestants in France and hundreds of thousands of Huguenots fled to other countries in Europe. The Pamments went to England.

      John Moore Pamment was born at Isleham, Cambridgeshire, England, on May 19, 1857, the third of six children born to Benaiah Pamment, a coach builder, and his wife. When he was eleven years old his father died, and he had to go to work to help his mother support his two brothers and three sisters. For a short time he worked in a large perfumery warehouse in London. Then he went to work in a tea warehouse, making tea for the tea tasters. But he wanted to learn a business, and he was most interested in the newspaper business. So when an opportunity came to become an apprentice in a printing shop, he took it because he wanted to learn newspaper work from the bottom up, to understand all phases of the work.

      He worked his way up from the print shop to the office and later became editor of a journal called "The Temperance Caterer," a paper published in the interest of the temperance cause. Later he became editor of a journal called "The Timber Merchant," a journal published in the interest of the lumber business.

      Having had to go to work at such an early age, he had very little schooling. But he wanted an education and studied at home from books during the little spare time he had. He worked a long day, from six o'clock in the morning to seven o'clock in the evening. He had to walk two miles to and from work every day and carried a book with him so he could read as he walked. He got his education the hard way, but he got it.

      When he was fifteen years old he was converted, and he pledged his life to the service of God. He was determined to become a minister of the gospel of Jesus Christ, and he studied to that end by the means of books and with the help of the famous Charles Hadden Spurgeon of London.

      He had a fine tenor voice and liked to sing, so he joined a singing society in London and sang in the choir of the Episcopal church where he worshipped. He also joined and worked with the London Open Air Mission, an organization that held gospel services in parks, hospitals, jails, and anywhere there was an opportunity to preach the gospel.

      When he was twenty-four years old he married Miss Agnes Thomas of Ware, Hertfordshire, England, on September 17, 1881. She was from a good English family and her father was manager of the gas works in the town of Ware. A son (the writer) was born to them on September 27, 1882.

      In 1884 he decided to go to America and engage in missionary work, as there was a call for missionaries in that country at that time. Having been ordained as a minister in the Congregational Church of England, John took his family to New York in September of that year. They crossed the United States to Montana where he became pastor of a Congregational church in the town of Glendive, Montana. It was a rural church and the congregation was scattered over a wide area. He had to visit his flock on horseback, riding from house to house. It was a wild country and there were many buffalo and other wild animals. They stayed in Glendive one year. In 1885 they went to Washougal, Washington on the Columbia River, where he took a pastorate in a Congregational church. They stayed there two years, but Mrs. Pamment became homesick for England and the folks at home, so they returned to England in 1887, where they stayed for five years.

      But John still yearned for missionary work in America, so they returned in 1892. When Mr. Pamment told the Open Air Mission members that he was going to America to engage in missionary work, they took an offering and presented him with eighty pounds to help him. This gift proved most welcome and helpful and kept his family until he got started in missionary work in Washington.

      They left England in July 1892 on the steamship Mongolian and landed at Quebec, Canada. It took ten days to go across the Atlantic Ocean and it was a calm, pleasant trip. After a seven-day trip across Canada via the Canadian Pacific Railway, they arrived at Vancouver, British Columbia. There he left his family, now consisting of two sons and a daughter, at the Secord Hotel while he went to Tacoma, Washington, to seek missionary work.

      John had been informed that the Presbyterian Church there wanted a pastor for the church on the Puyallup Indian Reservation near Tacoma. So he applied and was appointed to take charge, becoming the second missionary to the Puyallup Indians under the Presbyterian Board of Home Missions. He succeeded the Reverend M.G. Mann, the first missionary there since the mission was established in 1873, who had resigned.

      He moved his family to Tacoma in September 1892. They stayed with Mr. Wilson, the clerk at the government school adjoining the church property on the reservation, until they were able to rent a house in Tacoma to live in while a manse was built on the reservation. During the time they lived in Tacoma, another son was born. The family now consisted of three sons and one daughter.

      The church had been built in 1880, but no provision had been made to accommodate the missionary and his family. Reverend Mann, the first missionary, had lived in Tacoma. But the Indian people wanted their missionary to live among them, so it was decided to build a manse near the church.

      The building was started between the church and the Indian cemetery, which adjoined the church land on the east side of the church. But as there was not enough room there, it was necessary to move the cemetery fence over four feet. When the house was half finished, some of the older Indians complained that the spirits of the dead were offended at the moving of the fence, and the fence would have to be replaced. So the building was stopped and the half-finished house was moved over to the other, or west side, of the church, and the cemetery fence was replaced on its old line. The building was resumed and the house was completed in the spring of 1893, and the missionary and his family moved into it. At first there was no water supply piped to the house, and it was necessary to carry drinking water from the Wilson house next door, since it was connected to the water system of the government school nearby. A little later a pipe was extended and a faucet was put on the house outside the back door, while rainwater caught in a barrel from the roof furnished water for washing.

      At first the mission included the Mud Bay and Quinalt Indian Reservations, and the missionary visited them once a month by horse and buggy. But it was soon found that the three fields were too much for one missionary, so the work was reduced to the Puyallup Indian Reservation only. It was all one missionary could care for efficiently.

      At that time there was a large Indian school operated by the United States Department of Indian Affairs on the reservation adjacent to the church property. It was a boarding school and housed some 300 Indian children from all over the Northwest and Alaska. The superintendent, Mr. Chalcraft, was a fine Christian man, and he cooperated with the missionary in an effort to teach the gospel to the students in the school. He organized a Sunday School and a Christian Endeavor Society in the school. He divided the students into two groups, one of boys and one of girls, and had them march to church on Sunday morning. The church and the school worked together to educate the Indian children spiritually as well as intellectually. He trained the Indian children to sing, and his hundred-voice choir was noted throughout the district.

      The older Indians could speak and understand little or no English, so it was necessary to speak to them through an interpreter. Some of the Indian men who acted as interpreters were Jerry Meeker, John Swan, Henry Sicade, Willie Wilton, Charles Cheadchit, and a man called Fat Jack. Some others helped at times when necessary. Since it was not possible to have an interpreter when calling on the people at their homes, Reverend Pamment learned the Chinook Jargon, a language invented by the Hudson Bay Company for use in trading with the Indians in the Northwest. It was used and understood by the Indian people, but it was not well adapted for conveying spiritual messages. For instance, if he wanted to say "God loves you," he would have to say "Saghalie Tyee, yahka hyas kloshe tum-tum kopa mika." This means "High Chief, he is of a good mind toward you" or "God feels kindly toward you." He used that language in visiting and sometimes in preaching on Sundays when no interpreter was present.

      Every year at harvest time Indians from all parts of the Northwest came up the Puyallup River in their large dugout canoes to work in the hop and berry fields and orchards in the vicinity. They camped on the riverbank near the church for about two weeks until they were assigned to the various hop and berry fields and orchards where they were to work. The campground was a piece of vacant land between the Puyallup River and the county road at the foot of the hill on which the church was located. When they left for the various fields they dragged their canoes up out of the river and covered them with matting or canvas to protect them from the sun until they returned. Then they would camp for a few days again before leaving for home.

      Reverend Pamment used to visit them in camp and try to help them and tell them about Jesus Christ and our Heavenly Father. On one occasion there was sickness among them. A girl about twelve years old was ill with a high fever. The missionary wanted to call a doctor, as there was one at the Indian school, but they would not have one. They said an evil spirit was in her, and their medicine men would take care of her. They brought a plank into the tent and two men hammered on it with sticks all night to drive away the evil spirit. The poor girl died. The noise of their hammering and shouting was terrible.

      Once a month Mr. and Mrs. Pamment gave a potlatch and dinner at the manse and in the church. They served coffee and buns and sandwiches all afternoon, and the people came and enjoyed a social time. They came from all over the reservation; men, women, children, and dogs, by buggy wagon and on horseback. They enjoyed these gatherings, and always wanted to know when there would be another one. The missionary was always called for weddings, baptisms, christening of children, and funerals.

      A Saturday dance was established in the school, the music being furnished by a band organized and conducted by the head teacher, Mr. Philips. He was a good musician and the band was a good source of entertainment and was often called to furnish music for special functions. Reverend Pamment often had a guest speaker or singer sent by one of the churches in Tacoma.

      The government maintained an office in Tacoma known as the Indian Agency, to assist the Indians in selling their land. The agent in charge always had whiskey on the table in the office, which led to a lot of drunkenness among the Indian people. Many were cheated out of the value of their land. On one occasion an Indian and his wife went to the office and were given whiskey and got drunk. On the way home his wife fell off the wagon, and the two-horse team continued on until it stopped in front of their home. When the man became sober he missed his wife. He obtained help and they searched back along the road and found her drowned in the water in the ditch beside the road.

      Reverend Pamment visited the Indian people in their homes, especially in cases of sickness or sorrow or misfortune. They loved to have him with them. Sometimes it would be too late to come home because the roads were very bad in winter, and he would stay overnight, often sleeping on the floor with ten or more in a room.

      The Indians liked to visit at his home, and he and Mrs. Pamment often entertained a whole family. He was frequently asked to help someone among the Indians, and often loaned someone money and never got it back. He tried to teach the Indians to observe the Sabbath as a holy day and not to do business on that day. Once he loaned an Indian five dollars and the man came to pay it back on Sunday. The missionary said, "We do not do any business on the Sabbath. Come and pay it back on another day." The man never returned to pay it.

      On one occasion measles broke out in the Indian school and the whole school was quarantined for several weeks. Once there was a bad fire in the school building. The water supply was not adequate to put it out, so the Tacoma Fire Department was called. There was a creek flowing across the road in front of the school building a short distance away so a bucket brigade was formed and water was carried from the creek until the fire department arrived. Then they pumped water from the creek and extinguished the fire. The building was badly damaged, but was repaired at once. The fire started from a chimney in the office, which was in the center of the building. Much of the furniture on the second floor, which was the girls' dormitory, was thrown from the windows and broken and had to be replaced. There were no electric lights or wiring in the building, as it was lighted by oil lamps.

      Reverend Pamment kept two cows, a horse, chickens, ducks, and some rabbits. He bought all his hay, oats, and feed from the Indians. One day a man came along the county road driving a large flock of sheep. There was a hole in the hedge that separated the road from the Northern Pacific Railway track near the foot of the hill on which the church was situated, and one sheep jumped through it, followed in quick succession by others. Before the man could reach the spot, more than fifty sheep had gone through onto the railway track. He had a difficult time getting them back.

      On February 8, 1895, a fifth child, a daughter, was born to Mr. and Mrs. Pamment in the manse. In 1896 Mrs. Pamment's health failed and her doctor thought it might benefit her to leave the river valley and live on the high ground in Tacoma. So they moved from the reservation into the city. Reverend Pamment traveled to and from the Indian mission by horse and buggy, or on horseback, as occasion required.

      The teachers and instructors in the Indian school were a group of fine Christian people who cooperated with the church in carrying on Christian work among the students who came from all parts of the Northwest and Alaska. In 1895 an inspector was sent from the Department of Indian Affairs in Washington DC to visit the school. He went back and reported that there was a nest of Protestants there that must be cleaned out, and cleaned out it was. Soon the superintendent and some of the teachers were transferred or removed and nonbelievers were put in their places. The new executives had no interest in missionary work, with the result that the Sunday School and the Christian Endeavor Society were discontinued. The students were not required to attend church unless they chose to do so, so very few attended. There was no more cooperation between the church and the school.

      After the Sunday School was abolished, there was no way to minister spiritually to the student body in the school. It broke the missionary's heart to see all his work among the young people wrecked by an unbelieving group of school officials who cared nothing about the students' spiritual welfare. As the white man bought the Indian land, the Indian people became scattered around and it became more difficult for the missionary to reach them. But Reverend Pamment continued to work against difficulties and discouragements.

      Mrs. Pamment's health continued to fail, and with a greater distance to travel to reach his flock, it necessitated his being away from home a great deal. It also became more difficult to attend to his duties on the mission field and nurse a sick wife. In March 1904 another daughter was born to Mrs. Pamment, giving them a family of three sons and three daughters.

      In the summer of 1904 Reverend Pamment decided to resign and go into the business world for a time so he could be home with his family every night. In August of that year he bade a sad farewell to the Puyallup Indians. It was a sad parting, for they all loved him and regretted losing him. For a time he took up bookkeeping in the lumber business, but later returned to old and former work, the newspaper business.

      On June 16, 1912, Mrs. Pamment went to her eternal home after a long illness that developed into a hardening of the liver. They were living in Victoria, British Columbia, Canada at the time. They went there for her health, thinking it would benefit her. She had lived a beautiful Christian life, and she has gone to a rich and satisfying reward.

      Since Reverend Pamment's first love was preaching the gospel, he returned to the ministry in the Presbyterian Church after Mrs. Pamment died. He took a pastorate in a small rural church in Eastern Washington. In 1916 he married an old friend whom he had known in Washougal, Washington, in 1885. Her name was Lillian Russel. She had married a minister named Reverend Willert in 1892, and he had died leaving her a widow for several years. Reverend Pamment continued preaching until 1927, when at the age of seventy years he retired. They lived in Olympia, Washington for ten years. During that time, he worked with the local Presbyterian church as a bible class teacher.

      On May 22, 1937, at the age of eighty years, the Lord called him home. He was a faithful servant of God; kind and tender with his family; patient and understanding with the flock committed to his care; loved and respected by the Indian people and all others who knew him; an influence for good in the community where he lived. He has gone to a well-earned reward.

      Farewell Father. We shall meet again in the glad hereafter where there shall be no more sorrow or parting.

      My highest ambition is that I may be found worthy to go where he is and have the joy of being reunited with my beloved father and mother who await me over there."

  • Sources 
    1. [S537] 1900 United States Federal Census, Ancestry.com, (Name: Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2004.Original data - United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Twelfth Census of the United States, 1900. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1900. T623, 18;), Year: 1900; Census Place: Tacoma Ward 5, Pierce, Washington; Roll: T623_1749; Page: 5B; Enumeration District: 185..
      Birth date: May 1857 Birth place: England Marriage date: 1882 Marriage place: Residence date: 1900 Residence place: Tacoma city, Pierce, Washington Arrival date: 1892 Arrival place:

    2. [S540] 1920 United States Federal Census, Ancestry.com, (Name: Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2010. Images reproduced by FamilySearch.Original data - Fourteenth Census of the United States, 1920. (NARA microfilm publication T625, 2076 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Census, Reco;), Year: 1920; Census Place: Woodland, Cowlitz, Washington; Roll: T625_1920; Page: 14A; Enumeration District: 49; Image: ..
      Birth date: abt 1858 Birth place: England Residence date: 1920 Residence place: Woodland, Cowlitz, Washington Arrival date: 1887 Arrival place:

    3. [S564] Selected U.S. Naturalization Records - Original Documents, 1790-1974, Ancestry.com, (Name: Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2009.Original data - Record of Admissions to Citizenship, District of South Carolina, 1790-1906; (National Archives Microfilm Publication M1183, 1 roll); Records of District Courts of the Un;).
      Residence date: Residence place: Washington

    4. [S536] 1930 United States Federal Census, Ancestry.com, (Name: Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2002.Original data - United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Fifteenth Census of the United States, 1930. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1930. T626,;), Year: 1930; Census Place: Olympia, Thurston, Washington; Roll: ; Page: ; Enumeration District: ; Image: ..
      Birth date: abt 1858 Birth place: England Residence date: 1930 Residence place: Olympia, Thurston, Washington Arrival date: 1883 Arrival place:

    5. [S538] 1910 United States Federal Census, Ancestry.com, (Name: Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2006.Original data - Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910 (NARA microfilm publication T624, 1,178 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29. National Archives, Was;), Year: 1910; Census Place: Tacoma Ward 5, Pierce, Washington; Roll: ; Page: ; Enumeration District: ; Image: ..
      Birth date: abt 1857 Birth place: England Residence date: 1910 Residence place: Tacoma Ward 5, Pierce, Washington Arrival date: 1892 Arrival place:

    6. [S525] 1891 England Census, Ancestry.com, (Name: Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2005.Original data - Census Returns of England and Wales, 1891. Kew, Surrey, England: The National Archives of the UK (TNA): Public Record Office (PRO), 1891. Data imaged from The National A;), Class: RG12; Piece: 1049; Folio 121; Page 28; GSU roll: 6096159..
      Birth date: abt 1858 Birth place: Isleham, Cambridgeshire, England Residence date: 1891 Residence place: Hendon, Middlesex, England

    7. [S522] 1861 England Census, Ancestry.com, (Name: Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2005.Original data - Census Returns of England and Wales, 1861. Kew, Surrey, England: The National Archives of the UK (TNA): Public Record Office (PRO), 1861. Data imaged from The National A;), Class: RG 9; Piece: 154; Folio: 117; Page: 17; GSU roll: 542582..
      Birth date: abt 1858 Birth place: Tolehsan, Cambridgeshire, England Residence date: 1861 Residence place: Hackney St John, Middlesex, England

    8. [S563] Web: Washington, Find A Grave Index, 1853-2011, Ancestry.com, (Name: Online publication - Provo, UT. USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012.Original data - Find A Grave. Find A Grave. http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi: accessed 27 February 2012.Original data: Find A Grave. Find A Grave. http://www.findagrave.com/cg;).
      Birth date: 19 May 1857 Birth place: Death date: 22 May 1937 Death place:

    9. [S523] 1871 England Census, Ancestry.com, (Name: Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2004.Original data - Census Returns of England and Wales, 1871. Kew, Surrey, England: The National Archives of the UK (TNA): Public Record Office (PRO), 1871. Data imaged from the National A;), Class: RG10; Piece: 307; Folio: 16; Page: 30; GSU roll: 818889..
      Birth date: abt 1858 Birth place: Isleham, Cambridgeshire, England Residence date: 1871 Residence place: Islington St Mary, London, England

    10. [S524] 1881 England Census, Ancestry.com and The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, (Name: Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2004. 1881 British Isles Census Index provided by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints © Copyright 1999 Intellectual Reserve, Inc. All rights reserved. All use is subject to the l;), Class: RG11; Piece: 1134; Folio: 48; Page: 2; GSU roll: 1341277..
      Birth date: abt 1859 Birth place: Isleham, Cambridgeshire, England Residence date: 1881 Residence place: Stedham, Sussex, England

    11. [S99] Birth certificate.

    12. [S323] Isleham baptisms 1566-1905.

    13. [S41] 1881 Census PRO RG11 Piece 1134 Folio 48 Page 2.

    14. [S50] 1891 British Census for Hendon, Middlesex, St. Mary's.
      RG12/1049

    15. [S408] Presbyterian Ministerial Directory 1898.

    16. [S183] Death certificate Washington Record #92-97, Registered #212, copy from Washinton State Dept. of Health, Division of Vital Statistics.

    17. [S146] Cemetery record for John Moore Pamment, map of plot from Masonic Memorial Park, 455 North Street, Tumwater, Thurston County, Washington.

    18. [S789] England & Wales, FreeBMD Marriage Index, 1837-1915, FreeBMD, (Name: Ancestry.com Operations Inc; Location: Provo, UT, USA; Date: 2006;).

    19. [S327] Isleham Parish Register (1566-1851).

    20. [S537] 1900 United States Federal Census, Ancestry.com, (Name: Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2004.Original data - United States of America, Bureau of the Census. Twelfth Census of the United States, 1900. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1900. T623, 18;), Year: 1900; Census Place: Tacoma Ward 5, Pierce, Washington; Roll: T623_1749; Page: 5B; Enumeration District: 185..
      Birth date: Jul 1861 Birth place: England Marriage date: 1882 Marriage place: Residence date: 1900 Residence place: Tacoma city, Pierce, Washington Arrival date: 1892 Arrival place:



    21. [S426] THE EATONVILLE DISPATCH.
      Eatonville, Washington, January 12, 1917 Volume 2, Number 21